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beyerch

Technology expert, voider of warranties, mad scientist.

Oracle Inventory User Maintenance Scenarios

Overview

The Oracle Inventory is a series of registry entries and files that keep track of all Oracle products / patches that are installed on a machine. As certain portions of Oracle Inventory are stored in a user specific manner, product and patching problems can occur if multiple user accounts are utilized for product installation and/or patching operations. (e.g. User 1 installs Product A, and User 2 attempts to patch Product A)

Common Oracle Inventory / User related scenarios / solutions are:

  1. A user account is used to install software / apply patches and this account is disabled / deleted at a later date – Assuming no additional Oracle software has been installed, this is easy to fix via a combination of file copy / registry updates.
  2. Multiple user accounts have been used to install Oracle Software – In this scenario, the inventory needs to be recreated under one user regardless as to whether the accounts exist or not.

[IMPORTANT – It is strongly recommended to install/patch all software with a non-user specific account, where possible.  While certain security policies may not allow this, using a global account will ensure you do not have to perform the steps in this document.  ]

Prior install account has been disabled / deleted

In this scenario, an account used to install the Oracle EPM Software has been disabled / deleted and we are unable to patch the environment as the Oracle Inventory for the current user does not have knowledge of the prior installed products. The recommended fix is to reassign the previous user account’s Oracle Inventory to the new user account.

To move the Oracle Inventory, perform the following steps:

  1. Identify service account and setup with local administrator access on all Hyperion machines
  2. Copy .oracle.instances file from the user account which was used previously to the new account. In the example below, the user was epm_admin making the path to the file C:\Users\epm_admin\.oracle.instances.NOTE: This file may not be visible depending on your file folder view settings.

  3. Modify Windows Registry Hive & Key values – Replace the old install user with the new one
    1. Rename Computer\HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\ORACLE\KEY_EpmSystem_<old user>
    2. Update the values for ORACLE_GROUP_NAME & ORACLE_HOME_NAME keys so that they refer to the new user account.

 

  1. Modify file C:\Program Files\Oracle\Inventory\ContentsXML\inventory.xml

Replace any reference to the old install account with the new account

  1. Confirm OPatch software shows inventory properly by:
    1. Opening a Windows Administrator Command Prompt
    2. Navigate to the Oracle\Middleware\EPMSystem11R1\OPatch folder
    3. Execute the Opatch utility:Opatch lsinventory –oh <Install Drive>:\Oracle\Middleware\EPMSystem11R1 –jdk <Install Drive>:\Oracle\Middleware\jdk160_21
    4. Visually verify that the installed patch list corresponds with what has been installed

Oracle products have been installed to multiple accounts

In this scenario, multiple accounts have been used to install Oracle software. Patching attempts may fail or appear to operate successfully, though not all products are truly updated. To resolve this issue, the Oracle Inventory will need to be rebuilt targeting one user account.

NOTE: It is strongly recommended that a generic/service account is used for Oracle installation / patching to prevent these issues.

To rebuild the Oracle Inventory, perform the following steps:

  1. Log onto the server as the account which will contain the Oracle Inventory
  2. Execute the createInventory.bat script located in the <Install Drive>:\Oracle\Middleware\EPMSystem11R1\Opatch

Screen Clipping

  1. From the main menu, click on the Install menuScreen Clipping
  2. Scroll through the contents list to confirm that all installed products are reflectedScreen Clipping
  3. Monitor the Installation progress.NOTE: This may run for a while, > 10 minutes

    Screen Clipping

  4. On the Specify Source Location screen, provide the location of the products.xml file.NOTE: Should be <Install Drive>:\Oracle\Middleware\EPMSystem11R1\common\epmstage\Disk1\stage\products.xml

    Screen Clipping

  5. Specify the Oracle Inventory Home DetailsNOTE: By default this is OUIHome / C:\OraHome, use OUIHome1 & C:\OraHome1

    Screen Clipping

  6. Scroll through the provided list and ensure your products are shown and then click NextScreen Clipping
  7. Review items on the summary screen and click InstallScreen Clipping
  8. Upon completion of steps above, re-run the Opatch utility to confirm installed products now appearScreen Clipping

Oracle EPM / Windows Prerequisite Tuning [Part 1]

If you are installing Oracle EPM in a Windows environment, there are a plethora of settings you need to tweak per Oracle guidance.  To greatly simplify this process, I made a script that performs all of the steps for you, saving you a pile of time / effort.  There are a few steps that you’ll need to do manually; however, this will allow you to perform these steps in a fraction of the time *and* ensure that your servers are configured in a consistent manner.

NOTE:  Part 2 of this post will actually go into what these settings do.  For now, just enjoy a free script.

http://charlescbeyer.com/Infra_Win_Prereq.txt

@echo off

@REM ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
@REM - Name: Infra_Win_Prereq.bat
@REM - Author : Charles Beyer
@REM - Creation Date : 11/2/2015
@REM - Last Modified DAte : 7/17/2017
@REM - DESC: The purpose of this script is to configure Oracle required default settings for Oracle
@REM -       Hyperion Enterprise Performance Management products running on Windows 2012, 2008, 2003
@REM -
@REM - Inputs :
@REM            %username% - Windows system variable containing the currently logged on user
@REM            %COMPUTERNAME% - Windows system variable containing the current machine name
@REM
@REM - Outputs : Command line success/fail responses
@REM -
@REM - NOTES: There are a few steps that cannot be performed via command line
@REM -         Those items are in the script and will be called out.
@REM -         User should perform the manually
@REM -         The logged on user while running this script should be the EPM Service Accout as some of the
@REM -         config items are a "per user" setting.
@REM -
@REM - Items Configured in this script are:
@REM -       DHCP Check (Should be using Static IPs)
@REM -       Time Sync w/ Domain Controller
@REM -       UAC Disable
@REM -       Local Security Policy Permission Settings
@REM -           (*NOTE* You need ntrights.exe for these steps. Available on Windows Resource CD of online download)
@REM -       Disable DEP
@REM -       Windows Firewall Disable
@REM -       Group Policy Updates (Disable force registry unload)
@REM -       Windows Power - Set to Max performance
@REM -       Adjust Advanced Display Settings to 'Best Performance'
@REM -       TCP Tuning Settings (Part 1)
@REM -       Worker Threads
@REM -       Disable Delete TEMP on logoff / Disable 'per user' temp folders
@REM -       TCP Tuning (Part 2)
@REM -       Remove TMP / TEMP User Environment variables
@REM -       Disable Anti-Virus reminder (I can't disable anti-virus software, just display message to add exceptions, etc.)
@REM -       Disable Internet Explorer Enhanced Security

@REM -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

@REM -------------------------- DHCP Check --------------------------------------
@REM Check for any Dynamic IP addresses as we should be used STATIC
@ECHO Checking for Dynamic IPs.
@ECHO If DHCP is shown as enabled, please investigate further.
@ECHO Static IPs are expected.
ipconfig /all | find "DHCP Enabled."

@REM Add space between command output
@ECHO.

@REM -------------------------- Time Sync w/ Domain ---------------------------------
@REM Sync time to Domain Server
@ECHO Configuring Date/Time to be synchronized with Domain Controller
w32tm /config /syncfromflags:domhier /update
net stop w32time
net start w32time

@REM Add space between command output
@ECHO.

@REM -------------------------- UAC Disable ---------------------------------
@REM Disable UAC
@ECHO Disabling UAC
reg add HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System /v EnableLUA /t REG_DWORD /d 0 /f

@REM Add space between command output
@ECHO.

@REM -------------------- Local Security Policy Permissions --------------------
@ECHO Please review Location Security Policy Permissions and assign the service/install account
@ECHO 'Adding Logon as service' right
ntrights +r SeServiceLogonRight -u %username% -m \\%COMPUTERNAME%

@ECHO Adding 'Logon as batch job' right
ntrights +r SeBatchLogonRight -u %username% -m \\%COMPUTERNAME%

@ECHO Adding 'Act as part of the OS' right
ntrights +r SeTcbPrivilege -u %username% -m \\%COMPUTERNAME%

@ECHO Adding 'Bypass Traverse Checking'
ntrights +r SeChangeNotifyPrivilege -u %username% -m \\%COMPUTERNAME%

@REM Add space between command output
@ECHO.

@REM -------------------- Disable DEP --------------------
@REM Disable Data Execution Prevention (DEP)
@ECHO Disabling Data Execution Prevention (DEP)
bcdedit /set nx AlwaysOff

@REM Add space between command output
@ECHO.

@REM -------------------- Disable Firewall --------------------
@REM Disable Firewall
@ECHO Disabling Firewall for EPM
netsh advfirewall set currentprofile state off

@REM Add space between command output
@ECHO.

@REM -------------------- Upgrade Group Policy --------------------
@REM Update Group policy to Disable force unloaded of user registry upon logoff
@ECHO Updating Group policy to Disable force unload of user registry upon logoff
reg add "HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\System" /v DisableForceUnload /t REG_DWORD /d 1 /f

@REM Add space between command output
@ECHO.

@REM -------------------- Set Power Option to High Perf --------------------
@REM Set Power Option to High Performance
@ECHO Setting Power Option to High Performance
powercfg /S SCHEME_MIN

@REM Add space between command output
@ECHO.

@REM -------------- Update Adv Settings for Best Performance --------------
@REM Update Advanced Settings / Adjust for Best Performance (UI)
@ECHO Updating Advanced Settings / Adjust for Best Performance (UI)

reg add "HKCU\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\VisualEffects" /v VisualFXSetting /t REG_DWORD /d 2 /f

@REM Add space between command output
@ECHO.

@REM ------------- Registry Updates (TCP / Session Mgr / Term Svr) -------------
@REM Add Windows Registry settings for TCP Performance, Additional CPU Thread settings, Disable Delete Temp Directories on Exit
@ECHO Updating Registry settings for TCP, CPU, Temp/User
reg add "HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Tcpip\Parameters" /v TcpTimedWaitDelay /t REG_DWORD /d 30 /f
reg add "HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Session Manager\Executive" /v AdditionalCriticalWorkerThreads /t REG_DWORD /d 64 /f
reg add "HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Session Manager\Executive" /v AdditionalDelayedWorkerThreads /t REG_DWORD /d 20 /f
reg add "HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server" /v DeleteTempDirsOnExit /t REG_DWORD /d 0 /f
reg add "HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server" /v PerSessionTempDir /t REG_DWORD /d 0 /f

@REM Add space between command output
@ECHO.

@REM ------------------- Network Performance Settings -------------------
@REM TCP Performance Settings
@ECHO Apply TCP Performance Settings

netsh int tcp set global autotuninglevel=disabled
netsh int tcp set global chimney=disabled
netsh int ipv4 set dynamicport tcp start=1025 num=64000
netsh int ipv4 set dynamicport udp start=1025 num=64000
netsh int ipv6 set dynamicport tcp start=1025 num=64000
netsh int ipv6 set dynamicport udp start=1025 num=64000

@REM Add space between command output
@ECHO.

@REM ------------------- Remove TEMP USER Env Variables -------------------
@REM Delete User TEMP variables
@ECHO Deleting Current User defined TEMP/TMP Environment Variables
@ECHO NOTE: You may see ERROR / Unable to find key messages. These indicate the
@ECHO TMP / TEMP environment variables have not been set for the current user.
reg delete HKCU\Environment /F /V TEMP
reg delete HKCU\Environment /F /V TMP

@REM Add space between command output
@ECHO.

@REM ----------------- Display Virus Exception Reminder ----------------
@REM Virus software warning
@ECHO IF virus scanning is active on this machine, be sure to do the following:
@ECHO - Disable Scanning on Hyperion servers during software installation
@ECHO - Enable Scanning after install, but exclude the \Oracle folders.

@ECHO.
@ECHO All steps complete, please review for any errors.

@REM ----------------- Disable IE Enhanced Security ----------------------
@REM This disables the IE enhanced security

@REM Disable for users (0 = disabled, 1 = enabled)
reg add "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Active Setup\Installed Components\{A509B1A7-37EF-4b3f-8CFC-4F3A74704073}" /v IsInstalled /t REG_DWORD /d 0 /f

@REM - Disable for Admin Users (0 = disabled, 1 = enabled)
reg add "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Active Setup\Installed Components\{A509B1A8-37EF-4b3f-8CFC-4F3A74704073}" /v IsInstalled /t REG_DWORD /d 0 /f

Security Devices, only as good as their implementation…

Security Devices, only as good as their implementation…

Recently, I needed to use an old program that is protected by a security device. The device, an M Activator hardware key, connects to your computer’s parallel port.

C:\Users\beyerch\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\Temporary Internet Files\Content.Outlook\K9R4HEY5\IMG_9355.JPG C:\Users\beyerch\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\Temporary Internet Files\Content.Outlook\K9R4HEY5\IMG_9356.JPG

Figure 1 – M Activator Security Key

If the security device is not attached to the PC, the application program will restrict your access to certain application functions or prevent you from using an application altogether.

C:\Users\beyerch\AppData\Local\Temp\SNAGHTML1dd2ee31.PNG

Figure 2 – Application Rejection due to no hardware key

Since I own the software and still have the security key, none of this should be a problem. Unfortunately, modern computers no longer have parallel ports! As the software isn’t maintained, I can’t call the original provider for an alternative leaving me with few choices. The first, and preferred, choice was to purchase a parallel port to USB adapter on-line. I purchased two highly rated units; however, the software failed to recognize the dongle when connected through either of the units.

C:\Users\beyerch\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\Temporary Internet Files\Content.Outlook\K9R4HEY5\IMG_9358.JPG

Figure 3 – Parallel to USB Adapters (that didn’t work..)

As the USB adapter routed was unsuccessful, my remaining option is to …. hack the security key or its implementation in the application program..

A Ridiculously Brief Discussion on Security/Hacking

The first rule of hacking is that you don’t talk about hacking. Wait, or is that the first rule of Fight Club? The first rule of hacking is to accept the fact that nothing will be 100% secure.

When a product is developed, the security implementation is typically driven many factors such as:

  • What is the risk/damage of being compromised?
  • How likely is it that the product will be attacked?
  • What impacts to the development process will occur due to security?
  • How will the timeline be impacted?
  • How will users of the product be impacted?
  • Does the development team understand and have security experience?
  • How much will can we afford????

Because of all of the competing considerations, product security typically looks more like the Griswold family truckster than the shiny red Ferrari.

Figure 4 – Typical Security vs Assumed Security

From the hacker’s perspective, product security really boils down to how badly they want it. Do they have the time, resources, team/skills, and money to dedicate to their mission.

In the case of my ancient dongle security application, I’m willing to invest about 60 minutes into seeing if I can get anywhere. After that, I dig out one of my older computers and use it with this program. (and hope it doesn’t ever die…..)

With that said, let’s see just how secure this old dongle application is…

Hacking 101

Now that we’ve decided that we’re going to take a stab at working around the security device, the first thing we need to do is gather information about our target. Before we can formulate a plan, we need to know what we’re up against. After about 5 minutes of research, we know the following about our target application/security device:

  • Application Program
    • Windows 32 bit executable
    • Written in C++
    • Program appears to leverage multiple external libraries, some of which are known/some are not
      • ZIP/PKZIP – File Compression
      • W32SSI.dll/.lib – ? Not sure. (yet)
  • M Activator Green Key
    • Made by Sentinel
    • The W32SSI files are related to this dongle

NOTE: Researching this scenario finds a lot of “hits” to people with similar scenarios. There are emulators and other products made to solve this problem; however, I’d rather try to figure it out myself first.

Given what has been found, it seems likely that the application program is going to use the W32SSI files to talk to the dongle. Depending on how this is done in the application, we may be able to update the application program and simply bypass the dongle. All we need to do is take a peek at the application software to see what is going on, no biggie.

Source Code, Assembly Code, Machine Code, Oh My!

If this were our application program, we could simply open it in our editor, make our desired changes to the source code, recompile the code, and be on our way. Since we didn’t write this program and the original company is no longer in existence, this isn’t an option. While we could look at the executable binary (e.g. Machine Code) unless you have a photographic memory, know low-level Windows modules by heart, and Intel OpCodes like the back of your hand, it’s going to be impossible to directly analyze the chain of files.

Figure 5 – Machine Code, no problem…..

While it might be cool to rattle off machine code instructions on trivia night, it would take us forever to try and analyze an application in this manner. Fortunately, there are many programs that we can leverage which will translate the machine code into something slightly easier to deal with, assembly code.

Figure 6 – Assembly Code

While assembly code is not nearly as friendly as actual source code, it is a 1 to 1 representation of the machine code in a somewhat human readable format. If you have an appropriate tool, such as the IDA Pro disassembler, you can convert the machine code into the assembly. This tool also allows us to map out the program flow and find text and object file references.

Using the IDA Interactive Disassembler

As mentioned previously, we can use IDA to do a quick search to see if our security device program is called. Since we know that the program uses the security key, we should be able to find one or more references to the W32SSI library files. Depending on how many and what type of references we find, we may be able to easily alter the program so that we can bypass the security hardware.

After opening the program in IDA, we can easily see that the W32SSI libraries are being used by checking the Imports section of IDA.

Figure 7- IDA Imports

In addition to verifying the presence of the libraries via the Imports screen, we can use the Functions / IDA view to find the code references:

Figure 8 – Locating code references to W32SSI

Somewhat surprisingly, the only two functions imported from the security program are referenced once!

Figure 9 – Code section using W32SSI functions

While we do not know what those routines do entirely, since they are only called once, it is safe to assume that they attempt to validate that a security key, of the right type, is connected. To help understand what we’re seeing, we can use the Graph View feature to get a visual representation of the code:

Figure 10 – Graph View of W32SSI logic

Looking at the Graph View of the code leveraging the W32SSI routines, we see that there are two main code branches. The branch on the left performs secondary checks and ultimate ends up with failure messages relating to a security key not being found. The code branch on the right simply returns a value of 1, which presumably is a “TRUE” response.

The Quick and Easy Fix

Looking at the code structure, it appears that the second W32SSI call is performing a check as to whether the security dongle is present or not. If the security dongle is found, a “TRUE” (1) is returned; otherwise, secondary tests are performed. (e.g. serial port instead of LPT, etc.)

Because of this, there appears to be a very easy way to “fix” the program. If we force the initial check to always return TRUE (or flip flop the PASS / FAIL check) then the application program will behave as if the key was present.

The following logic needs to be tweaked from:

call wSSIMIni
cmp eax, 0FFFFFFFFh
jz loc_409FBA

to:

call wSSIMIni
cmp eax, 0FFFFFFFFh
jnz loc_409FBA

JZ and JNZ are machine code instructions that are used in conjunction with comparison checks. If the result of a compare (CMP) instruction is ZERO, a Jump if Zero (JZ) instruction will result in a jump to another portion of the application. Jump if Not Zero (JNZ), on the other hand, results in a jump if the compare (CMP) instruction is non-zero.

To make the change, switch to the Hex View, right click on the highlight value and change the 84 to 85.

Figure 11 – Switching JZ to JNZ

After committing the change, you will see the code switch from

to

After starting the program, we no longer receive an error about the missing security key and the program operates as expected.

Well That Easy…..

While it may be hard to believe that changing one byte of data, by one digit, entirely bypassed an application’s security, this is a surprisingly common scenario. The security dongle used by this application could have been utilized much differently preventing this type of scenario, though. (e.g. the dongle could have stored a required piece of information that the application would need to operated properly)

FDMEE Essbase/Planning Script Execution Glitch

FDMEE Essbase/Planning Script Execution Glitch

When targeting Essbase/Planning applications through FDMEE, a particularly useful feature is the ability to trigger Calculation scripts before and after the Load process as well as before and after the Check process. Not only can you execute scripts, but you can control the execution order and pass script parameters. This functionality is quite useful for executing fixed scope data clear operations before the data load and executing targeting aggregation/calculations after the data load has been completed.

Figure 1 – FDMEE Target Application Calculation Script Editor

While this feature works great when the scripts are working, what happens when there is a script failure? If a script executed during the Load process fails, should the FDMEE Load step report a failure? (even if the data loaded?) How about a script failure during the Check step? Would you be surprised to know that currently in 11.1.2.4.210, this is not the case?

In the event of a successful load process, even if a script error occurred, all FDMEE “fish” steps will return gold and the Process Monitor report will reflect the same. (e.g. no issues) Your only indication of a failure will be in the job log for the data load process!

If you are currently leveraging this functionality, please be aware of this quirk until this is corrected!

NOTE(s):

  • 11.1.2.4.100 (Patch 20648390) advertises this as being fixed; however, it still presents itself in 11.1.2.4.200+ [See Defect: 20631385]
  • An enhancement request, 25217240, was created for this issue when submitted in 11.1.2.4.200. I do not know if this has been implemented yet; however, no fix is listed in the Defects Fixed Finders Tool through 11.1.2.4.210

Steps to Recreate [target a non-existent script]

#1 – Create FDM Target Planning Application and associate a Calculation script that does not exist in the target application


Figure 2 – Create Calculation Script references for our sample Target Application

#2 – Create your Location / Data Load Maps / Data Load Rule / etc.

#3 – Load a data file through and confirm that the Process Monitor reflects success.


Figure 3 – Perform a data load and confirm that the Process Monitor User Interface shows no errors

#4 – Pull Process Monitor report and confirm no errors reflected.


Figure 4 – Run the Process Monitor Report to verify it also does not reflect any errors

#5 – Review the log file

Since the script doesn’t exist, the FDMEE log will reflect an Essbase error due to the non-existent script.


Figure 5 – Review the Job log to verify an error is reflected in the logs

Version Information:


Figure 6 – Confirm version of FDMEE

Workaround

If your load process is being performed manually, the easiest recommendation is to have users review the log to confirm successful script execution.

If you are performing automated processing where it is not feasible to manually review logs, considering implementing an Event script to scan the log file for script success/failure and using that to trigger a failure in FDMEE / Error Log / Email Notification / etc.

PBCS Data Loading Glitch

PBCS Data Loading Glitch

While building out data load automations for PBCS and FCCS recently, I ran into a somewhat annoying issue when loading data to PBCS. Even more surprising is that Oracle claims it works as expected….. This post will explain the issue and provide a really simple work around until this gets properly addressed.

The Problem

Anyone who has worked with FDM Classic, FDMEE, or Data Management for any amount of time has run into at least one failed data load due to invalid dimension member(s) in their exported data. While the data load process should ensure that the target application metadata is current before loading data, this doesn’t always happen. (e.g. last minute source ERP updates that do not get properly communicated to the EPM team)

While a data load failure isn’t optimal, typically this failure is easy enough to identify and fix based off of the feedback provided from FDM/FDMEE/Data Management and the target application.

FDMEE / PBCS Merge Load Failure

FDMEE / Planning Merge Load Failure

cid:image010.png@01D1E6E3.8124EAE0

Data Management / FCCS Merge Load Failure

Unfortunately, when you perform a Replace export to a PBCS target application, under some circumstances you will get a quite unhelpful response:

Data Management / PBCS Replace Load Failure

What Happened?

When performing a Merge export, FDMEE/Data Management simply passes the generated data file to the target application for loading without any pre-processing. When performing a Replace export, a data clear script is dynamically generated based on the members contained in the export data.

The script will clear data for every intersection of Scenario, Year, Period, Entity, and Value dimensions. In the event that one of those members is missing in the target application, the dynamic clear script will contain an invalid member resulting in the error shown above. While the error shown above is completely legitimate, it isn’t meaningful enough to allow you to locate the member easily.

Oddly, if you recreate this scenario when loading to FCCS, you will have a much different result! When performing a replace load to FCCS, invalid members will result in meaningful errors that include the invalid member name(s)! Even more odd, Oracle Support will tell you that both are working as designed. It would seem that PBCS should behave similarly to FCCS to simplify troubleshooting efforts. (Perhaps if enough people raise this as an issue, they will address it?)

Work Around

The easiest way to work around this issue is to perform two data exports to PBCS for Replace operations. The first export should be a Merge load. As the dynamic clear script will not be generated for a Merge, this will result allow you to receive specific errors in the event that there is a data load failure. After have a successful Merge load, then perform the Replace load to ensure that all data gets cleared, etc.

Job Output from Merge/Replace Load Automation Process